Stories: Drought

  • Water’s Worth

    A country has to sell what it's got. Lesotho always had more rain and snow than it knew what to do with. So Lesotho made a deal with its neighbor, South Africa, to buy the water. The country moved rivers and built one of the most impressive water projects in Africa to deliver it. Then the drought hit. ...

  • Was It Worth It for Lesotho to Sell Its Water to South Africa?

  • Millions Face Starvation as Haiti’s Drought Stretches Into Its Third Year

    Mirene Raymond hasn’t seen a real downpour since last year. The 69-year-old rice farmer is one of millions at risk of malnutrition and starvation due to the combined effects of climate change and El Niño. “This is the first time in my life that I’ve seen things this bad,” she told ThinkProgress...

  • How Some Colombians Survive on Less Than One Liter of Water a Day

    Thousands of people are struggling to survive on less than a liter of water a day in La Guajira, Colombia. Guajira is home to the Wayuu people, Colombia’s largest indigenous population. But severe water scarcity is devestating Wayuu subsistence practices. Crops and livestock perished in a four-year drought. Jaguays (community water pods) evaporated, and...

  • Here’s How People Make Ends Meet in One of the Poorest Places in the World

    Niger is a country at peace. But a World Food Program distribution site in Torouf — a village about an hour’s drive from the city of Tahoua — seemed lifted out of a conflict zone. Sacks of millet emblazoned with the logo of the United States Agency for International Development awaited villagers clutching yellow ration cards. Staffers...

  • In Honduras, a Wellspring of New Tools to Tackle Drought

    Gumersindo Rodriguez has become accustomed to measuring his family's well-being in inches: of rainfall, of crop growth, and the height of his grandchildren. And by that gauge, the drought that’s afflicted his corner of Central America these past two years is the worst he’s seen. “Barbaric,” he calls it. Walking down the steep,...

  • Brazil’s Long-Impoverished Northeast Rides Into the Middle Class

    Surviving as a farmer in the semi-arid northeast of Brazil has never been easy – drought is perennial, poverty is highly concentrated, and for decades the region was known best known for its migratory patterns toward cities and the wealthier south. But Maria Joelma da Silva, standing on a dusty path that cuts through her cactus-covered backyard, emphasizes that farming...

  • The Maasai of Tanzania

    A Maasai woman rests sitting in a rock near her house in Uwiro, Tanzania. Driving by Maasai during a drought in Tanzania. Almudena Toral is reporting from Tanzania as a fellow with the International Reporting Project (IRP).