Stories: Conflict

  • Russia’s Disappearing Women

    When they were younger, before their son was born, Maria's boyfriend started hurting her. He would place his hands on her neck and squeeze tightly until her skin turned pink and she gasped for air. After her son Andrei came along, the abuse got worse, and her arms were regularly crowded with bruises, her face sore and swollen. Maria...

  • ‘I Don’t Go Out During the Day’: Inside Senegal’s LGBT Crackdown

    DAKAR, Senegal—Watching as dusk falls on the dusty streets of this city, Marie, a 27-year-old trans woman, explains that she only leaves her house after sunset. “I don’t go out during the day,” she says, flicking back her long red hair. “Only at night. I don’t even want to open my...

  • Inside the EU’s deeply flawed $200 million migration deal with Sudan

    In interviews with over 25 Eritrean and Ethiopian asylum seekers in Khartoum and the eastern city of Kassala, as well as local journalists, and lawyers working on behalf of refugees, IRIN has documented allegations of endemic police abuse, including extortion, violence, and sexual assault. The pattern of corruption and rights violations uncovered feeds into broader concerns over whether the EU&rsquo...

  • In Tanzania, mothers learn how to teach the facts of life

    DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania — On a warm Saturday in October, a dozen women in the neighborhood of Mbagala Charambe in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, sat together in the open-air waiting area at Samaria Health Centre. On most weekends, women gather here to learn how to talk with their preteen and teenage daughters about puberty, their changing bodies, contraception and...

  • The Logic of Power

    BLOCKADES ARE THE WORKHORSE of Bolivian political protest. People who live in La Paz, the seat of government, have grown accustomed to them. They know that, nearly any day, they can expect to be descending one of the steeply angled downtown streets, or squeezed into the back of one of the minibuses, or vans, that compose the mass transit system,...

  • For Senegal island’s residents, famed slavery heritage site incurs a cost

    Each day, Deguène Gaye watches the ferry chug in from the mainland, disgorging a herd of sunburned tourists onto Gorée Island’s white-sand beaches. From there, she knows, they’ll probably trace a familiar itinerary, following their guides somberly past a memorial to the transatlantic slave trade and then to the famous House of...

  • Sex education offers Syrian women the chance of a better life

    Sitting cross-legged around the edge of the bright and airy living room in an old Turkish stone house, the group of assembled women is transfixed. Ghazwa al-Milaji is making elaborate hand gestures. “You have two ovaries,” she says, twiddling her two hands mid-air. “And two fallopian tubes,” she adds, drawing arcs. Then she cups her palms...

  • Women and war: facing into the danger zones

    On the third Wednesday of March last year, eight people were laid to rest at the Yeşilkent cemetery in the Turkish city of Gaziantep. Each burial was careful recorded, with the name of the deceased, their age, their parents’ names and the date of their death. Seven people were listed that way. But one entry said simply: woman,...

  • Meet the Syrian refugee girls facing child marriage in Turkey

    Dalal Abdullah is just 13, but her mother has already had to fend off a string of requests for her hand in marriage. A rich Syrian who knew the family back in Aleppo whence they fled four years ago, came and offered 20,000 Turkish lira for the pretty young teenager. A wealthy Turk offered 30,000 lira — enough to pay the rent on...

  • Why It’s Now A Crime To Let Cattle Graze Freely In 2 Nigerian States

    Watch Tim McDonnell's accompanying video here. As a cattle herder in Benue, a rural state in central Nigeria, Sale Tambaya's life revolved around his herd of roughly 100 cows and a few dozen sheep. Normally, he would take them out from a pen near his thatched hut every morning to graze freely in the surrounding grassland. But on Nov. 1,...