Stories: Economy & Business

  • Suharto Museum Celebrates Dictator’s Life, Omitting Dark Chapters

    KEMUSUK, Indonesia — Indonesia’s former dictator looms in bronze over the entrance to the small museum set amid the palm trees and emerald rice fields of central Java. Depicted in a military uniform and peaked officer’s cap, he radiates calm authority over the village of his birth. To many, the New Order government that Suharto led...

  • The Omnipresence of Dust in Kathmandu

    It's the middle of winter, and the wards of Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital in downtown Kathmandu, Nepal, are full of people who can't breathe. On the third-floor pediatrics ward, Basanta K.C. balances his baby daughter, Bursa, in his right arm and deftly threads a narrow plastic tube into her nostrils. As she struggles for air, her...

  • You’re welcome to visit the longest beach in the world — unless you’re a refugee

    It was a hot Saturday in May when Bangladesh’s prime minister dipped her feet in the ocean. Sheikh Hasina was visiting the beach town of Cox’s Bazar and, like anyone else, she wanted to take a barefoot stroll. The beach runs unbroken along the Bay of Bengal for 75 miles, enough to make it the world&rsquo...

  • Who Bears the Brunt of Thailand’s Crackdown on Migrant Workers?

    It has been more than 10 years since Aye Min fled Myanmar amid the fighting between the military and the Karen nationalist forces. With nothing but the clothes on her back, Aye Min boarded a boat in 2006 and crossed the Moie river to Mae Sot, a district located at the border of Thailand and Myanmar. Now 43, Aye Min lives in a...

  • Nepal: Economic migrants spark unlikely shifts in power

    Each day, thousands of Nepalis fly out of Kathmandu for work. They serve in restaurants in Europe and farm plantations in East Asia, but an increasingly large percentage are employed in menial jobs in the Gulf states, where work visas are easy to come by, and labour is badly needed. Today, about three million Nepalis, some 10 percent of the population,...

  • Wives of Warring Rivals Strive to Bring Peace to Nigeria’s Kaduna State

    GOLKOFA, NIGERIA – The shouting started in the distance, but Zulai Bello knew it would soon reach her front door. As the voices got louder, she grabbed her seven children and ran from their home in the Nigerian village of Golkofa. Minutes later, the mob of angry men reached her house and burned it to the ground. Bello and her...

  • A world without men? When men go abroad to work, women in Nepal take the lead at home.

    Night has fallen inky black and cold over Amar Basti village, but Kalpana Thapa and her neighbors are loath to drift off to bed. They punch at their phones, pull shawls tighter and coo at the children careening around. A light bulb, powered by a shared electricity line, illuminates the concrete platform that serves as Thapa’s dining room. ...

  • Potentially the World’s Least Fun Beach Beer

    Outside, the Indian Ocean was the temperature of bath water, lapping gently at the shore. The dull murmur of the waves was barely audible above the incessant horns of passing rickshaws and motorized three-wheelers scooting through Cox’s Bazar, a burgeoning tourist town in Bangladesh’s southeast corner. The beach runs unbroken for 75 miles, allegedly the longest in...

  • In drought-stricken Mali, women maneuver for land - and a future

    IRP fellow Alex Potter reported from Mali on the ways in which women struggle to maintain control of their land amidst environmental challenges and gender discrimination. The video can be viewed here.

  • Are Qatar’s reform efforts falling short?

    When Ranjit Kumar Sah finished his schooling in Nepal, Qatar was the natural next step. Though his village is so remote it takes half-an-hour to reach a paved road, it’s located in an area that has become one of the epicentres of Nepal’s labour migration boom. Between 2009 and 2015, migration from Dhanusha District more than doubled, and...