Stories: Economy & Business

  • In a changing Mongolia, higher stakes for out-of-school herding boys

    In a few days Otgonmuren’s family will pack up their ger, their round felt tent home. It is late August, time for herders to relocate for the winter. Some of them will relocate, that is. His sisters will stay in town to attend boarding school. Mungunshur, 16, plans to be a doctor. Munkhzul, 8, also plans on college, though she...

  • Sex education offers Syrian women the chance of a better life

    Sitting cross-legged around the edge of the bright and airy living room in an old Turkish stone house, the group of assembled women is transfixed. Ghazwa al-Milaji is making elaborate hand gestures. “You have two ovaries,” she says, twiddling her two hands mid-air. “And two fallopian tubes,” she adds, drawing arcs. Then she cups her palms...

  • Women and war: facing into the danger zones

    On the third Wednesday of March last year, eight people were laid to rest at the Yeşilkent cemetery in the Turkish city of Gaziantep. Each burial was careful recorded, with the name of the deceased, their age, their parents’ names and the date of their death. Seven people were listed that way. But one entry said simply: woman,...

  • Meet the Syrian refugee girls facing child marriage in Turkey

    Dalal Abdullah is just 13, but her mother has already had to fend off a string of requests for her hand in marriage. A rich Syrian who knew the family back in Aleppo whence they fled four years ago, came and offered 20,000 Turkish lira for the pretty young teenager. A wealthy Turk offered 30,000 lira — enough to pay the rent on...

  • After soccer star risked all for Europe, Gambia still wrestles with why she left

    For much of Fatim Jawara’s life, almost her entire world fit here – into a single rambling stretch of dirt road in a rundown beach town at the western tip of Africa. It was here, behind the high green walls of her family’s compound, that her mother, a professional cook, taught her to make akara, black-eyed...

  • Can helping men in Mongolia improve life for women?

    Over green tea at a Western-style cafe in the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar in late summer, Temuulen rattles off reasons why Mongolian men need help: poor health, high unemployment and heavy drinking. As vice director of the nonprofit Men’s Association, Temuulen, who, like many Mongolians, uses only one name, has a lot to say about the status of...

  • Why It’s Now A Crime To Let Cattle Graze Freely In 2 Nigerian States

    Watch Tim McDonnell's accompanying video here. As a cattle herder in Benue, a rural state in central Nigeria, Sale Tambaya's life revolved around his herd of roughly 100 cows and a few dozen sheep. Normally, he would take them out from a pen near his thatched hut every morning to graze freely in the surrounding grassland. But on Nov. 1,...

  • Congo’s quiet collapse

    Far from the international spotlight, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC’s) crisis is silently suffocating its citizens. On a humid morning in Mbandaka — the crumbling provincial capital of the densely forested Équateur province in the DRC — 50-year-old Jerome Bokele sits on a broken wooden chair in the courtyard of his small breezeblock compound....

  • Gay, Out And On The Airwaves In Kinshasa

    Sitting at his desk in a stuffy office with a rainbow flag hanging behind him, 31-year-old Patou Izai says it takes a lot of courage to come out as gay in Kinshasa, the sprawling capital city of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Although this vast, volatile Central African nation does not have the harsh anti-gay laws adopted by neighbors such...

  • Meet Ami, Mali’s biggest female rapper

    There aren’t many female rappers in Mali. The West African country is known for the bedouin ballads of Tinariwen, the enduring voice of Khaira Arby, and the new-rock beats of Songhoy Blues. But Mali is not so famous for its rap scene—and even less so for its female rappers. Ami is an exception. “There is...