Stories: Arts and Culture

  • The Texture of Injera

    On my first night in Addis Ababa, I was introduced to the main staple of Ethiopian food: Injera. Injera is a sponge-like, sourdough bread made from teff that looks like a giant textured pancake and is used to scoop up different types of usually spicy Ethiopian stews called wat. Although I have dined at Ethiopian restaurants before in the States,...

  • A Snapshot of Ethiopia

    I have been in Ethiopia as an International Reporting fellow for a little over a week now and it has been an amazing, eye-opening trip so far. I have learned so much about this beautiful landlocked country of 90 million people. I have been warmly welcomed into their lives and have enjoyed the curiosity of the children at my blond hair...

  • 17 Delicious Ethiopian Dishes All Kinds Of Eaters Can Enjoy

    Ethiopian cooking can be heavy on meat — but the east African country’s cuisine is also full of delicious and super-satisfying dishes that are perfect for vegetarian, vegan, and gluten and lactose-free eaters. Ethiopian food is probably best known for the spongy sourdough flatbread called injera, which serves as the “spoon” for lentil, bean, meat,...

  • 10 Facts About Ethiopia

    Statue of the Lion of Judah. Photo: Rjruiziii via Wikimedia Commons I’ve learned a few intriguing things about Ethiopia in the midst of preparation for my International Reporting Project trip. Having never been before, I’m excited and eager to learn about the country, and culture. We will be reporting on newborn health when there, but...

  • Taking ‘Manic Mondays’ to a New Level: A Day in the Life of a Rio Public School Teacher

    A teacher poses with a blackboard reading 'Brazil School' as children sitting in front of desks with signs reading 'FIFA standard schools' hold official 2014 FIFA World Cup soccer balls, as they pose at what is meant to represent a public school classroom, during a protest against the 2014 World Cup, organized by non-governmental organization (NGO) Rio de Paz (Rio of...

  • ‘Our Second Mother’: Iran’s Converted Christians Find Sanctuary in Germany

    On a breezy Sunday morning, 17 Christian converts are being baptized into a Berlin congregation just in time for Christmas. The yellow, stained-glass windows, situated high enough to catch the sun’s beams, are glowing. The old wooden pews creak as more people, Bibles in hand, shuffle in to take a seat. Pastor Gottfried Martens, in an emerald green-colored...

  • Rap Music Creates Social Equality, Awareness, and Human Connections

    Rappers at the Centro Cultural Sao Paulo Our visit to Sao Paulo with The International Reporting Project was coming to a close. After a very hectic day of community heath visits and chatting with doctors, nurses, and community health workers, we just had to do something very cool. And what nicer thing than to rap our way into it? ...

  • A Haitian artist fights to preserve the vodou religion

    Erol Josué is a dancer, a recording artist, a vodou priest, and an expert on the vodou religion's culture and history. "They beat me in the name of Jesus," Josué sings in one song. "They burn me in the name of Jesus." The lyrics of this old vodou song date back to slavery days in the 18th...

  • Myanmar’s Historic Buildings Imperiled by Modern World

    Over cappuccino at a crowded conference on real estate in one of the world's last frontier markets, one investor turned to another and said breezily, "I'm here to get rich." They had paid more than $2,000 each to attend panels with titles like "Futurescape in Myanmar" and "Opportunities in Hotels and Resorts." The seminar's sponsors, which included...

  • Why I Am Grateful for Traveling to Africa

      I have written before that only a few short years ago I never wanted to visit Africa because I believed what the media fed me about the continent. I believed that Africa was full of child soldiers and brutal dictators. Ibelieved that diseases were rife across the continent. I believed that every country...