Stories: Women

  • Women carry the burden of Ugandan war trauma

    Beatrice Adyero* woke up one July morning in 2002 to news that completely shattered her life. Her husband, four sons, and a daughter-in-law were among 56 civilians abducted and killed by the Lord’s Resistance Army rebel group. Her youngest granddaughter, only two-years-old, wasn’t spared either. Nearly 16 years after the slaughter of her family, Adyero still struggles to...

  • Women are taking charge in Senegal’s growing tech industry

    On a balmy evening in Dakar, seven young women were gathered in the basement of a local university, not far from the city’s Monument of African Renaissance statue. Lit by the white glow of a projector screen, they tapped eagerly at laptops as the speakers covered everything from how to market your business on Instagram, to designing a...

  • A Weapon Doesn’t Know The Difference Between Father And A Son

    On the war “It started around 1981/2. The people here wanted independence because the government was not interested in Casamance. This is how it started. I was displaced from my village.  My house was burnt by rebels. I lost everything. I was separated from my children for a month. It was horrible. There was only pain. Just pain. ...

  • “If You Have Money, You Can Think Whatever You Want”

    People in Nepal’s Thulopakhar village shudder to hear of a girl going to work abroad. Under their voices, neighbors mutter about sex work, abuse, impropriety. In this village, nestled beneath the Himalayas, some 70 kilometers from the capital city of Kathmandu, boys leave because they have no choice but to earn money for their families; girls need to stay...

  • In Tanzania, mothers learn how to teach the facts of life

    DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania — On a warm Saturday in October, a dozen women in the neighborhood of Mbagala Charambe in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, sat together in the open-air waiting area at Samaria Health Centre. On most weekends, women gather here to learn how to talk with their preteen and teenage daughters about puberty, their changing bodies, contraception and...

  • The women and girls in Senegal pushing through the tech industry’s gender barriers

    The first time Binta Coudy Dé left Senegal was in 2011, when the then 22-year-old computer engineer was invited to participate in a tech competition organised by Microsoft in New York. Amongst the groups from all around the world participating in the competition, Dé’s group from Senegal was the only all-female team. “We knew that...

  • Meet Our Newest Fellows

    The International Reporting Project is awarding fellowships to report on different topics around the world. The following fellowships were awarded in late 2017 and early 2018.                           Religion Issues We congratulate the following journalists who were awarded fellowships in late 2017 and early 2018 to cover religion issues: Jessica Aguirre is...

  • Women and war: facing into the danger zones

    On the third Wednesday of March last year, eight people were laid to rest at the Yeşilkent cemetery in the Turkish city of Gaziantep. Each burial was careful recorded, with the name of the deceased, their age, their parents’ names and the date of their death. Seven people were listed that way. But one entry said simply: woman,...

  • After soccer star risked all for Europe, Gambia still wrestles with why she left

    For much of Fatim Jawara’s life, almost her entire world fit here – into a single rambling stretch of dirt road in a rundown beach town at the western tip of Africa. It was here, behind the high green walls of her family’s compound, that her mother, a professional cook, taught her to make akara, black-eyed...

  • Can helping men in Mongolia improve life for women?

    Over green tea at a Western-style cafe in the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar in late summer, Temuulen rattles off reasons why Mongolian men need help: poor health, high unemployment and heavy drinking. As vice director of the nonprofit Men’s Association, Temuulen, who, like many Mongolians, uses only one name, has a lot to say about the status of...