Stories: Nutrition

  • The Brazilian Guide to Weight Loss

    Bela Gil hosts one of Brazil’s most popular food TV shows, Bela Cozinha, now in its fifth season. The premise is putting a hip, healthy spin on Brazilian classics—think tofurkey, but not disgusting. In one episode, Gil baked cookies using the baru nut, which tastes a bit like peanuts and is crammed with...

  • Why Brazil Loves Breastfeeding

    The other day here, I saw something I rarely encounter back home in Washington. A young woman holding a toddler sat down at the table next to me at a boardwalk cafe. When the little boy got fussy, she tugged down her tank top and fed him in plain view of one of Rio’s largest thoroughfares. No blanket....

  • In Tanzania, Farmers Reap the Benefits of Radio

    How do you share ideas – including potentially transformative ones – with people who do not have Internet access, are largely illiterate, and live far from paved roads? Even in today’s hyper-connected world, most farmers in Tanzania – who make up 75 percent of the country’s population of  48 million –...

  • Reversing Chronic Malnutrition Starts Inside the Home

    Issa Abdulla’s sons, 10-year-old Nuhu and 7-year-old Sam, love dinners made with rabbit meat most. So the father of three (Sam and Nuhu have a 19-month-old sister named Tunda) gave each of his sons a rabbit of their own to raise and slaughter. “They’re excited about it,” Abdulla assured as his sons peeked around...

  • Fruit for Thought in Tanzania Nutrition Fight

    Selemani Hussaini never thought much about eating fruit in the past. The 46-year-old Tanzanian farmer mainly eats ugali, a thick maize-based porridge. Toss in a few cooked beans, tea or instant coffee and this completes a typical meal. "This is how we are raised to eat," says Hussaini. "No one really talked about fruit." Hussaini lives in Tanzania&rsquo...

  • Motherhood in Tanzania

    Throughout my travels in Tanzania for the past ten days, every time I saw a mother and her baby I smiled inside. And I was even more happy to see mothers breastfeeding their babies, as breastfeeding has been proven to be a key intervention to keep more children under the age of five alive in developing countries. Tanzania,...

  • The Trouble With Maasai Boys

    A drought in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area in northwest Tanzania claimed the lives of more than 200 children in 2011. The dry season and unsure rains mean that the Maasai children that live in the region are still at risk. It may be the boys who are at the greatest risk. Girls fall behind at an early age compared to their...

  • Tanzanian Pigs and Livestock: Developing World Agriculture

    I love traveling and love it more when I can find pigs. I may even have to make it one of my life goals to see them on every continent where they exist — in all their glory. The thing about countries in much of east Africa (where I am now) and the Middle East however, is that they...

  • How Community Gardens Are Changing Lives in Tanzania

    Up in the lush Uluguru Mountains in Morogoro, Tanzania, a USAID-funded nutritional program, Mwanzo Bora (which means "good start" in Swahili) has been put in place to help increase local mothers’ breastfeeding rates, lower the number of expectant mothers with anemia, and provide parents with the nutritional know-how to properly feed their children a well-balanced diet. Through a...

  • Tanzania’s Agricultural Landscape