Stories: Ngos

  • “Every Woman Has Basic Human Rights”

    Earlier this year I chaired a panel with Joan Smith, Baroness Helena Kennedyand the novelist Kishwar Desai. We were discussing male sexual violence in India, following the worldwide protests about the rape, torture and murder of a young woman in Delhi. The event, at The Nehru Centre in London, was held to launch Desai's latest novel...

  • Walking Through a Medical Supplies Warehouse in Zambia

    In Zambia there is one central location where over 600 medicines are stored for distribution throughout the country. I was recently in Zambia as a guest of Malaria No More and its new campaign, Power of One that ensures that with a small $1 donation a Zambian child will receive a full course of malaria treatment and...

  • Farming Eden in Tanzania

    If there is an Eden for international charities in Tanzania, it might be a small plot in the Malala sub-district of Nambala. Goats feed from green grass while standing on elevated enclosures. The cows are close behind in their own pen that sits directly next to a bio-gas generating system, across from caged chicken and surrounded by elevated key-hole...

  • Leaving Unfinished Business in African Villages

    Today I visited a One Acre Fund farmer training meeting in Magulilwa village in Iringa District in Tanzania. You might of heard of the One Acre Fund from Roger Thurow’s groundbreaking book, The Last Hunger Season. In fact, I personally learned about the One Acre Fund from his book, and I readily admit I...

  • In Conversation with Paulette Joseph

    During his campaign for presidency of Haiti, Michel Martelly made education was of his priorities.  Once elected he quickly established the “Program for Universal Free and Obligatory Education (Programme de scolarisation universelle gratuite et obligatoire –PSUGO)” PSUGO was supposed to increase access to education for millions of primary school children through the allocation...

  • Evictions, Hunger, Continued Persecutions, and One Victory

    Last Wednesday, agents of the state and local police forcefully evicted residents of Camp Bristou in Peguy Ville. Bristou is overlooked by Mojub school, which is part of SOPUDEP community, and many of the women, men and children who attend the school and literacy classes lived in the camp and the surrounding area. In nearby Delmas, the residents at...

  • Listening Now

    When Lalita* was raped by her 18-year-old nephew, she did not know that filing a case would have dramatic social consequences. The morning after the attack, Lalita went to Rajawadi Hospital, a government-run hospital in Mumbai. There she was examined and medicines were prescribed. She went straight to the police station to file a complaint. A day later, she was...

  • Unequal Knowledge: Pregnancy and Discrimination

    We all know that mothers and babies in India are dying. We have some of the highest rates of maternal and infant mortality in the world and tragically, a lot of it is preventable. Access to information is key. Quite simply, many women do not do the right things because they don’t know what they are. Across rural...

  • Growing Haiti – Piti, Piti, Wazo Fe Nich Li.

    Growing Haiti is a South-South collaboration which focuses on strengthening Haitian women and families via sustainable micro gardening initiatives. With the support of friends and family, Mark Jacobs, a Guyanese farmer, writer, and educator, has been working with Haitian people on growing vegetables and other sustainable agriculture related initiatives. One focus is income generation from selling excess produce. The...

  • Translating Public Health into Media

    It’s 10am, and we’re talking about death. Deaths from disease and neglect—deaths the world could prevent, if only for… Name the disease, and someone in this room will know what it takes to stop it. The room is full of advocates and policy makers and United Nations types. They want to inspire (or...