Stories: Africa

  • No Woman Should Lose Her Life, Giving Life

    Mrs. Bello has been bleeding since giving birth.  Let’s go back to the beginning. A true-life story is told about a pregnant woman (whom I’ll refer to as Mrs. Bello) who did not realize her pregnancy had gone past nine months. It was not until her neighbour offered to introduce her to a local...

  • Kibera, La Ciudad Sin Nombre

    Un grupo de japoneses cruza las vías del Uganda Railway Line, que atraviesa Kibera, el mayor suburbio de Nairobi y de África, y asciende por la cuesta jalonada de chabolas. Algunos llevan paraguas para protegerse del sol; otros, botas de agua para cuidar los pies de todo mal. Van de excursión o prospección...

  • A Day at the Magoye Health Clinic in Zambia

    I first became interested in mobile health technology and global health exactly a year ago while visiting my sister Nia, a Peace Corps Volunteer, in rural Zambia. As a nurse at the Magoye Health Clinic outside of Mazabuka, Zambia, Nia introduced me to the world of mHealth. As an 2013 International Reporting Project New Media...

  • In Mozambique, a Glorious Inn Becomes a Slum

    Over the course of any given day, people move constantly through Mozambique's Grande Hotel, retracing the steps of guests who used to climb staircases curved like seashells, and ate meals with a view of the Indian Ocean. Once billed as the "Pride of Africa," the hotel still throbs with the activity of a place where thousands eat and sleep...

  • How Men in South Africa Are Trying to Stop Violence Against Women

    A dozen teen-aged boys sit in plastic chairs alongside opposite walls of the converted mobile trailer, forming not so much a discussion circle as parallel lines of slumped shoulders and restless twitchy legs. They came here to the One Man Can Men's Wellness Center in Gugulethu straight from school, still wearing their uniforms of maroon sweaters with crisp white...

  • Into the Heart of the Niger Delta

    1. A year ago, I made a reporting trip to Nigeria. I went there because Nigeria has oil. And nearly all of it is in the Niger Delta, a swampy area along the country’s southern coast. Militant groups like the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) and the Niger Delta People’s Volunteer Force (NDPVF)...

  • Fighting AIDS in Obama’s Ancestral Land

    World AIDS Day is approaching, and it's time, once again, for an accounting. In the roughly 30 years since the disease was recognized, more than 25 million (pdf) have died from it. An estimated 34 million (pdf) are living with it; 2.5 million new infections are recorded each year. There has been progress. As anti-retroviral medications become more widely...

  • Mombasa Rising? Secessionist Movement Grows on Kenya’s Coast

    Kenya's Coast Province boasts of wealth of opportunity -- pristine beaches, deluxe hotels, a major port and an oil refinery -- but for locals in the picturesque city of Mombasa, it's hardly a paradise. Years of land grabbing and cronyism have made them squatters on their own ancestral lands. Increasing numbers of residents feel they can only gain...

  • One Reason Kenyan Girls in Poor Areas Don’t Go to School

    Keeping girls in school is a vital part of any international aid program. It's an issue important to highlight today, on the first ever United Nations International Day of the Girl. Over the past few decades, this has shown to have lasting effects, not only for the girls themselves, but also for their families, their communities and for...

  • Obama Step-Grandma on Women’s Rights

    No visit to Kenya is complete without calling on Sarah Obama, President Obama's remarkably sharp 90-year-old step-grandmother, the woman who raised his father, Barack Obama Sr. Since the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign, Westerners have trooped to her door, eager to learn about the president's African heritage from the woman he calls "Granny." Obama used her accounts of the...