Ruxandra Guidi's Blogs

  • Quito Portrait #5: Polivio Morocho Guaman

    Polivio Morocho Guaman, 58 years old, has been selling “cevichochos” (a ceviche with chochos, a bean unique to the Andes) at Parque La Carolina for 35 years. <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/103295192" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/103295192">Quito Portrait #5: Polivio Morocho Guaman</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/bearguerra">roberto (bear) guerra</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • The Kids Who Leave, And Those Who Stay Behind

    Now that the images of children sleeping on the floor and in crowded detention facilities have seen the light, suddenly, the U.S. government is grappling with this new “border crisis” and the public is trying to make sense of it all. Why would kids as young as five be traveling alone under such dangerous conditions? I understand the reasons why, as a reporter who got to know Ronald Aldana’s story while living in Los Angeles. Yet I still struggle with the heartbreak of what it all must mean for each of those kids and their families, their neighbors, and their wider communities. Children and teenagers have been leaving alone from Honduras, or El Salvador, for many years — but the dangers and desperation that motivate that trek have worsened exponentially. Officials may say the number of children apprehended at the...

  • Postcards from Invisible Cities #4

    We'll be traveling from July 13-26, back to Kuna Yala, Panama... so we'll post a new Quito Portrait when we return. But in the meantime, here's another image from the streets... Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • Coconuts on the Sand

    This is the season of hurricanes and heavy storms. But the archipelago of Kuna Yala, located south of the hurricane belt, is typically spared the damage and strong winds that hit islands further north in the Caribbean, year after year. In recent years, however, rains have forced the people living in these islands — an estimated 30,000 — to start making drastic changes to their way of life. The first time we visited the island of Usdupu in October of 2010, the water came down daily, flooding the narrow dirt paths that connect all the thatched roof homes. Kids played in the brown water half-naked, without a worry in the world. But some of their parents spoke to us about being unable to cook with charcoal on the floor, as is their tradition, due to the persistent flooding. Others showed us how they were using cement...

  • Quito Portrait #4: Tomás Echeverria

    In this week's Quito Portrait, we hear from Tomás Echeverria - a single man who ekes out a meager living with his guitar. <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/100275549" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/100275549">Quito Portrait #4: Tomás Echeverria</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/bearguerra">roberto (bear) guerra</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • Ni Una Muerte Mas

    There are graffiti throughout Quito with the slogan “Yo Soy 65” — I am 65. The people behind it, a loose collective of young women’s rights and health access organizations, quote a recent national poll that says that 65% of Ecuadoreans today support access to a legal and safe abortion. And yet, abortion remains illegal and controversial in this country, except in the case of the rape of a developmentally challenged woman, or when a pregnancy threatens the life of a mother-to-be. Ecuador has the highest rate of teenage pregnancy in South America: 81 births per 1,000 women between the ages of 15 and 19. Not surprisingly, this trend is largely true for poor and working class women. Yet one positive development in women’s access to birth control came last year, with a new law requiring that the morning-after pill be accessible to all Ecuadoreans,...

  • Quito Portrait #3: Leonor Medina

    In the third of our series of mini photo/audio portraits of people in Quito, we hear from our favorite fruit vendor at Mercado Santa Clara - Leonor Medina. <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/99690287" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/99690287">Quito Portrait #3: Leonor Medina</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/bearguerra">roberto (bear) guerra</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • Postcards from Invisible Cities #3

    A crowd gathers to watch Sunday breakdancing in the Plaza Grande, Quito Ecuador, 29 June 2014. Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • It Sucks To Get Kicked Out

    Earlier this week, Ecuador became the only South American national soccer team to be eliminated from the first phase of the World Cup. This was a sad thing to witness in a country where soccer fever is as strong as anywhere else in the region; a place where “hincha” culture is big. On the day of the defeat, so many people donning the yellow jerseys they’d bought on the street for $10. Recently, there was even an article in Ecuador’s El Comercio paper saying that some of the street vendors selling soccer jerseys had made all their money for the month, and were betting on yet another win. Bars and restaurants capitalized on the event by showing off their enormous high-definition television sets. Government offices closed at 2:30 pm, to give people 30 minutes to get to the bar or the...

  • Quito Portrait #2: Alejandro Hinojosa

    In the second installment of our Quito Portrait series, we visit with Alejandro Hinojosa, a young entrepreneur born in the U.S. to Ecuadorean parents, who in the last year and a half has started two small hotels. <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/99135014" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/99135014">Quito Portrait #2: Alejandro Hinojosa</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/bearguerra">roberto (bear) guerra</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

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