Blog Posts

  • Quito Portrait #2: Alejandro Hinojosa

    In the second installment of our Quito Portrait series, we visit with Alejandro Hinojosa, a young entrepreneur born in the U.S. to Ecuadorean parents, who in the last year and a half has started two small hotels. <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/99135014" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/99135014">Quito Portrait #2: Alejandro Hinojosa</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/bearguerra">roberto (bear) guerra</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • In Defense of Making Out in Public

    The central plazas of Latin American cities and towns are there for people to come together, whether it be parents chasing their kids chasing pigeons, or old men sitting on benches listening to a soccer game on tiny, battery-powered transistor radios. Plazas, parks, and alleys can also be intimate spaces — and when the people who move through them are young, and in love, a heavily transited street can become as private as people wish them to be.  As a kid growing up in Caracas, Venezuela, I remember checking out young couples at the plaza with some envy. They would hold hands, sitting side by side on a bench, even kissing or laying on the grass together, without even noticing my stare. This was their right, and the rest of us, young or old, seemed to be there to indulge in watching them. If...

  • Postcards from Invisible Cities #2

    A woman walks across the courtyard outside Ecuadorean artist, Oswaldo Guayasamin's, Capilla del Hombre in Quito, 15 June 2014. Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • Quito Portrait #1: Gustavo Enrique Molina

    In the first of what will be an ongoing series of short photographic and audio portraits of people we meet here in Quito, we visit with Gustavo Enrique Molina - a 65 year old man who has operated a shooting gallery game in Parque La Carolina for over 50 years. <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/98599840" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/98599840">Quito Portrait #1: Gustavo Enrique Molina</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/bearguerra">roberto (bear) guerra</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> Ruxandra Guidi is reporting on health and development in South America as a fellow with the International Reporting Project. This post originally appeared on Fonografia Collective.

  • Hello From Ethiopia

    I’ve been in Ethiopia for some 24 hours now. It's my third trip to Africa in almost as many years, but my first time in this country. The air is muggy, familiar. And I can feel the hustle and bustle of a thriving Addis Ababa around me. I’ve yet to venture far from my hotel room (that’s what tomorrow brings), but it feels good to be back. Once again, I’m traveling with the International Reporting Project, who took me to Zambia last summer to report on HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. This time, I’m exploring a topic I’ve been passionate about for decades—the issue of maternal and newborn health. The itinerary is a full one; the possibilities immense. In addition to IRP’s programming which includes meeting with a...

  • Ethiopia Bound

    I can hardly believe it is already here! Tomorrow I will be leaving well before the sun rises for my next adventure: Ethiopia. I will be one of nine new media journalists heading with The Johns Hopkins International Reporting Project to Ethiopia to report on newborn health. It is bound to be a life-changing experience and I can hardly wait to share what I learn on my blog. I’ve done a ton of reading and research over the past few months yet I’m sure nothing will prepare me for our visits especially in rural villages. I will be gone for two weeks and am flying directly to a wedding in Chicago all in the same 24 hours afterwards. It is going to be quite an adventure! The best part of all is I will be traveling with a...

  • ONE Moms Travel to Ethiopia to Report on Newborn Health

    Meet ONE Moms Elizabeth Atalay and Nicole Melancon – both world travelers, advocates, and social good digital journalists who met at a blogging conference several years ago. Although they live across the country from one another, they have frequently worked together on campaigns with ONE, World Moms Blog, and Mom Bloggers for Social Good to advocate for global health, and to help alleviate poverty. On June 14th the pair will embark on an epic two-week journey as international reporting fellows with the International Reporting Project (IRP) and seven other fellows. The New Media Fellowship focuses on newborn health, a topic critical in Ethiopia’s fight against extreme poverty, and to continue improvements in maternal, newborn, and child health. After meeting up in the capital city, Addis Ababa, They will travel to remote regions of the country where they will meet with a diverse...

  • World Moms Blog Editors Heading to Ethiopia to Report on Newborn Health

    We have exciting news at World Moms Blog! Two World Moms Blog Editors, myself and Elizabeth Atalay, have been selected to travel to Ethiopia this June as New Media journalism fellows with The International Reporting Project (IRP).  Last April, World Moms Blog Senior Editor Purnima Ramakrishnan of India was a fellow on the IRP’s Brazil trip where she reported on the reduction of poverty and hunger in Brazil, and how it has embraced the Millennium Development Goals to improve the lives of its citizens. The International Reporting Project (IRP) is based at The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of the John Hopkins University and the primary goal of the IRP is to provide journalists with the opportunity to report internationally on issues not traditionally covered in mainstream media. The ...

  • How You Can Celebrate International Day of the Midwife

    I am just back from spending over two weeks in Ethiopia. At every health clinic and hospital I visited in both rural and urban areas I had the great privilege of chatting with new and seasoned midwives about their life-saving work. Midwives play a pivotal role in maternal and newborn health in Ethiopia and around the world. Why?  Because midwives have been trained to save lives.  In low-resource settings a midwife’s care and attention can mean the difference between a woman dying from sepsis and having a routine healthy delivery. Did you know that maternal mortality cannot be reduced without midwives? Did you know each year we lose close to 300,000 women and 3 million infants? Midwives could prevent most of those deaths. And finally, did you also know that the survival of every newborn depends on quality care...

  • Water on Our Doorstep This Earth Day

    “Universal access to water is a right to all and now it is just on our doorsteps,” said Celia. I was traveling as a International Reporting Project Fellow, and we had just arrived in the semi-arid city of Cumaru, in the North-Eastern state of Pernambuco. We had lunch at the home of Joelma, a farmer in Cumaru. She made delicious rice and palma (a variety of sustainable cacti, native to the land, and which is used to feed both livestock and people) salad with lots of vegetables in it . And then we went to the farm of her sister-in-law, Celia. When Celia was six years old, she used to go downhill and carry water back up to her home in pots and buckets, and she recalls them being very heavy. When she cajoled her father, he sometimes let her use a donkey...

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